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E-BOOK
Title Trust in social media / Jiliang Tang and Huan Liu.
Imprint San Rafael, California (1537 Fourth Street, San Rafael, CA 94901 USA) : Morgan & Claypool, 2015.

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Description 1 online resource (1 PDF (xiii, 115 pages)) : illustrations
Series Synthesis lectures on information security, privacy, and trust, 1945-9750 ; # 13
Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science.
Synthesis lectures on information security, privacy and trust ; # 13. 1945-9750
Note Part of: Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science.
Title from PDF title page (viewed on October 25, 2015).
Bibliog. Includes bibliographical references (pages 99-113).
Note Available only to authorized UTEP users.
Subject Social media -- Moral and ethical aspects.
Contents 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Definitions of trust -- 1.1.1 Trust in psychology -- 1.1.2 Trust in sociology -- 1.1.3 Trust in economics -- 1.1.4 Trust in management -- 1.1.5 An interdisciplinary view of trust definitions -- 1.1.6 Discussions -- 1.2 Examples of online trust systems -- 1.2.1 E-commerce sites -- 1.2.2 Expert sites -- 1.2.3 Review sites -- 1.2.4 News sites -- 1.3 Computational tasks for trust -- 1.3.1 Representing trust -- 1.3.2 Predicting trust -- 1.3.3 Applying trust -- 1.3.4 Incorporating distrust -- 1.4 Summary.
2. Representing trust -- 2.1 Properties of trust -- 2.1.1 Transitivity -- 2.1.2 Asymmetry -- 2.1.3 Composability -- 2.1.4 Correlation with similarity -- 2.1.5 Context dependence -- 2.1.6 Dynamic -- 2.2 Trust representations -- 2.2.1 Probabilistic vs. gradual representations -- 2.2.2 Single-dimensional vs. multi-dimensional representations -- 2.3 Recent advances of trust representations -- 2.3.1 Dimension correlation -- 2.3.2 Temporal information -- 2.3.3 Trust, untrust, and distrust.
3. Predicting trust -- 3.1 Basic concepts -- 3.1.1 Definition -- 3.1.2 Classifications of trust metrics -- 3.1.3 A unified classification of trust metrics -- 3.2 Algorithms of trust metrics -- 3.2.1 Global trust metrics -- 3.2.2 Local trust metricS -- 3.3 Evaluation of predicting trust -- 3.3.1 Datasets for predicting trust -- 3.3.2 Ranking-based evaluation -- 3.3.3 RMSE evaluation -- 3.3.4 Leave-one-out cross-validation evaluation -- 3.3.5 F-measure evaluation -- 3.4 Recent advances in predicting trust -- 3.4.1 Predicting multi-dimensional trust -- 3.4.2 Predicting trust with temporal dynamics -- 3.4.3 Predicting trust with social theories.
4. Applying trust -- 4.1 Traditional recommender systems -- 4.1.1 Content-based recommender systems -- 4.1.2 Collaborative filtering-based recommender systems -- 4.1.3 Hybrid recommender systems -- 4.2 Trust-aware recommender systems -- 4.2.1 Problem statement -- 4.2.2 Opportunities from trust information -- 4.3 Existing trust-aware recommender systems -- 4.3.1 Memory-based trust-aware recommender systems -- 4.3.2 Model-based trust-aware recommender systems -- 4.4 Performance evaluation -- 4.4.1 Datasets -- 4.4.2 Evaluation metrics -- 4.5 Recent advances in trust-aware recommender systems -- 4.5.1 Global trust in recommendation -- 4.5.2 Multi-faceted trust in recommendation -- 4.5.3 Distrust in recommendation.
5. Incorporating distrust -- 5.1 Incorporating distrust into trust representations -- 5.1.1 Understandings from social sciences -- 5.1.2 An computational understanding in social media -- 5.1.3 Distrust in trust representations -- 5.1.4 Social theories for trust/distrust networks -- 5.2 Incorporating distrust into predicting trust -- 5.2.1 Distrust in global trust metrics -- 5.2.2 Distrust in local trust metrics -- 5.3 Incorporating distrust into trust-aware recommender systems -- 5.3.1 Memory-based methods -- 5.3.2 Model-based methods -- 5.4 Recent advances in incorporating distrust -- 5.4.1 Sign prediction -- 5.4.2 Distrust prediction.
6. Epilogue -- 6.1 Future directions in predicting trust -- 6.2 Future directions in applying trust -- 6.3 Future directions in incorporating distrust -- Bibliography -- Authors' biographies.
Summary Social media greatly enables people to participate in online activities and shatters the barrier for online users to create and share information at any place at any time. However, the explosion of user-generated content poses novel challenges for online users to find relevant information, or, in other words, exacerbates the information overload problem. On the other hand, the quality of user-generated content can vary dramatically from excellence to abuse or spam, resulting in a problem of information credibility. The study and understanding of trust can lead to an effective approach to addressing both information overload and credibility problems. Trust refers to a relationship between a trustor (the subject that trusts a target entity) and a trustee (the entity that is trusted). In the context of social media, trust provides evidence about with whom we can trust to share information and from whom we can accept information without additional verification. With trust, we make the mental shortcut by directly seeking information from trustees or trusted entities, which serves a two-fold purpose: without being overwhelmed by excessive information (i.e., mitigated information overload) and with credible information due to the trust placed on the information provider (i.e., increased information credibility). Therefore, trust is crucial in helping social media users collect relevant and reliable information, and trust in social media is a research topic of increasing importance and of practical significance. This book takes a computational perspective to offer an overview of characteristics and elements of trust and illuminate a wide range of computational tasks of trust. It introduces basic concepts, deliberates challenges and opportunities, reviews state-of-the-art algorithms, and elaborates effective evaluation methods in the trust study. In particular, we illustrate properties and representation models of trust, elucidate trust prediction with representative algorithms, and demonstrate real-world applications where trust is explicitly used. As a new dimension of the trust study, we discuss the concept of distrust and its roles in trust computing.
Other Author Liu, Huan, 1958- author.
Other Title Print version: 9781627054041