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E-BOOK
Title The besieged ego : doppelgangers and split identity onscreen / Caroline Ruddell.
Imprint Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, 2014.

Copies/Volumes

LOCATION CALL # STATUS
 Internet  Electronic Book    AVAILABLE
Description 1 online resource (145 pages)
Bibliog. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Note Available only to authorized UTEP users.
Print version record.
Subject Doubles in motion pictures.
Doppelgängers.
Split self in motion pictures.
Identity (Psychology) in motion pictures.
Genre Electronic books.
Contents Why Psychoanalysis? -- The Ego in Freud and Lacan -- The Monster Within -- Gendering the Double -- Doubled Up: Body Swapping, Multiple Performance and Twins in the Comedy Film.
Summary The Besieged Ego critically appraises the representation, or mediation, of identity in film and television through a thorough analysis of doppelgangers and split or fragmentary characters. The prevalence of non-autonomous characters in a wide variety of film and television examples calls into question the very concept of a unified, 'knowable' identity. The form of the double, and cinematic modes and rhetorics used to denote fragmentary identity, is addressed in the book through a detailed analysis of texts drawn from a range of industrial, historical and cultural contexts. The doppelganger or double carries significant cultural meanings about what it means to be 'human' and the experience of identity as a gendered individual. The double also expresses in fictional form our problematic experience of the world as a social, and supposedly whole and autonomous, subject. The Besieged Ego therefore raises important questions about the representation of identity onscreen and concomitant issues regarding autonomy and what it means to be 'human'. Key Features Charts a generic account of the double onscreen Case studies include horror, fantasy, comedy, Japanese and Korean film
Other Title Print version: Ruddell, Caroline. Besieged ego. Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, ©2013 9780748692026