E-BOOK
Title The Cratylus of Plato : a commentary / Francesco Ademollo.
Imprint Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.

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Description 1 online resource (xx, 538 pages) : illustrations
Bibliog. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Note Available only to authorized UTEP users.
English.
Print version record.
Subject Plato. Cratylus.
Cratylus (Plato)
Language and languages -- Philosophy.
Contents Machine generated contents note: I.1. Subject and structure of the dialogue -- I.1.1. The correctness of names -- I.1.2. A map -- I.1.3. Making sense of etymology -- I.2. The characters -- I.2.1. Cratylus -- I.2.2. Hermogenes -- I.3. The date -- I.3.1. The dramatic date -- I.3.2. The relative date -- I.4. The evidence for the text -- 1.1. The thesis -- 1.1.1. First approach to the thesis (383ab) -- 1.1.2. More details: Hermogenes' name (383b-384c) -- 1.1.3. The origin of natural names -- 1.2. Before Cratylus -- 2.1. Convention and individual decision (384c-385b) -- 2.1.1. First statement (380e) -- 2.1.2. Public and private names (385ab) -- 2.2. Truth and falsehood in sentences and names (385bd) -- 2.2.1. True and false sentences (385b) -- 2.2.2. The parts of a sentence. True and false names (385cd) -- 2.2.3. Truth values and sentence structure -- 2.2.4. The passage's function in context -- 2.2.5. Authenticity and position of the passage.
2.2.6. Proclus' testimony -- 2.3. Convention and individual decision: further details (385de) -- 2.4. Hermogenes and Protagoras (385e-386e) -- 2.4.1. Man the measure of all things? (385e-386a) -- 2.4.2. The refutation of Protagoras [--] and of Euthydemus (386ad) -- 2.4.3. Conclusion: objects have a stable being (386de) -- 2.5. Before Hermogenes -- 2.5.1. Empedoclean and Thucydidean 'conventionalism' -- 2.5.2. De natura hominis and Democritus -- 3.1. First argument: the naturalness of actions (386e-387d) -- 3.1.1. The naturalness of actions. Cutting and burning (386e-387b) -- 3.1.2. Speaking (387bc) -- 3.1.3. Naming (387cd) -- 3.2. Second argument: the function of names (387d-388c) -- 3.2.1. Names as instruments (387d-388c) -- 3.2.2. Aristotle on names as instruments -- 3.3. Third argument: enter the namegiver (388c-389a) -- 3.3.1. The use and the making of instruments (388cd) -- 3.3.2. The lawgiver as name-maker (388d-389a) -- 3.3.3. Who is the lawgiver? -- 3.4. Fourth argument: instruments, names and forms (389a-390e).
3.4.1. Instruments and forms (382a) -- 3.4.2. Generic and specific forms of tools (389bd) -- 3.4.3. Forms of name (389d-390a) -- 3.4.4. The lawgiver and the dialectician (390bd) -- 3.5. Conclusion (390de) -- 4.1. Searching for a theory (390e-392b) -- 4.2. The theory discovered. Naturalism and synonymy (392b-394e) -- 4.2.1. 'Scamandrius' and Astyanax' (392bd) -- 4.2.2. Astyanax' and 'Hector' (392d-393b). The argument previewed -- 4.2.3. A lion begets a lion [--] and a king a king (393bd) -- 4.2.4. The relative irrelevance of letters and syllables (323de) -- 4.2.5. Synonymical Generation runs wild. The power' of names (324ab) -- 4.2.6. 'Hector' and Astyanax' again (394be) -- 4.3. Conclusion (394e-396c) -- 5.1. The arrangement of the etymologies -- 5.1.1. Analysis of 350-421c -- 5.1.2. The systematic character of the etymologies -- 5.1.3. Platonic views in the etymologies (396bc, 399bc, 400ab, 403a-404b, 410b) -- 5.2. The etymologies and the argument of the Cratylus -- 5.2.1. Ordinary proper names put aside (397ab).
5.2.2. The etymologies as doxography, or the suicide of naturalism (400d-401a) -- 5.2.3. The etymology as doxography (continued): the theory of flux (401d, 402a, 411bc) -- 5.3. More on the theory of flux -- 5.3.1. Locomotion -- 5.3.2. The Penetrating Principle (412-413d) -- 5.3.3. Further evidence about the atomists in the Cratylus (412b, 414a, 420d) -- 5.3.4. Atomism in the Theaetetus -- 5.3.5. The Penetrating Principle again (413e-414a, 417bc, 418a-419b) -- 5.3.6. Flux and relativity? -- 5.4. Meaning in the etymologies -- 5.5. Plato's attitude to the etymologies -- 5.5.1. Seriousness in the etymologies (414c-439bc) -- 5.5.2. The inspiration of Euthyphro (396c-397a) -- 5.5.3. Humour and detachment in the etymologies (398de, 399a, 406bc) -- 5.5.4. The etymologies' epistemological status -- 6.1. From secondary to primary names (421c-422c) -- 6.1.1. The postulation of primary names (421c-422c) -- 6.1.2. Intermezzo: the meaning of r3iiiia (399db, 421b, e) -- 6.2. The correctness of primary names (422c-424a).
6.2.1. Introduction (422ce) -- 6.2.2. Indication by gestural mimesis (422e-423b) -- 6.2.3. Indication by vocal mimesis (423bc) -- 6.2.4. Vocal imitation of the essence (423c-424a) -- 6.3. The imposition of primary names (424a-425b) -- 6.3.1. The etymologies of primary names: false start (424ab) -- 6.3.2. Division of letters (424bc) -- 6.3.3. Division of beings (424d) -- 6.3.4. Matching letters and beings (424d-425a) -- 6.3.5. Intermezzo: names, verbs and speech (425a) -- 6.3.6. First assessment of Socrates' programme -- 6.3.7. How names are and how they should be (425ab) -- 6.4. The investigation of actual primary names (425b-427d) -- 6.4.1. Disclaimers and preliminaries (425b-426b) -- 6.4.2. Letters and primary names: the examples (426c-427c) -- 6.4.3. Conclusion of Socrates' survey (427cd) -- 6.4.4. An assessment of the mimetic survey -- 6.4.5. The discussion with Hermogenes concluded (427de) -- 7.1. Introduction (427e-429c) -- 7.1.1. Preliminary exchanges (427e-428e) -- 7.1.2. Better and worse names? (428e-429b).
7.1.3. Hermogenes' name, again (429bc) -- 7.2. Naturalism and falsehood (429c-431c) -- 7.2.1. Naturalism and the impossibility of false speaking (429cd) -- 7.2.2. Cratylus against false speaking (429d) -- 7.2.3. Cratylus against false speaking, continued -- 7.2.4. Socrates' defence of false speaking (430a-431c) -- 7.2.5. Conclusion -- 7.3. Naturalism and imperfect resemblance (431c-433b) -- 7.3.1. First round (431ce) -- 7.3.2. Second round: Cratylus' argument from spelling (431e-432a) -- 7.3.3. Second round: Socrates' reply and the Two Cratyluses' (432ad) -- 7.3.4. Conclusions on fine and bad names (432d-433b) -- 8.1. Resemblance and convention in names (433b-435d) -- 8.1.1. Preliminaries (433b-434b) -- 8.1.2. The sklerotes argument: conflicting letters in the same name (434bd) -- 8.1.3. The sklerotes argument: understanding, indication, correctness (434e-435b) -- 8.1.4. Convention 'contributes' to correctness (435bc) -- 8.1.5. Conclusions on resemblance and convention in names (435cd) -- 8.1.6. Convention elsewhere in the Platonic corpus.
8.1.7. The ancient commentators -- 8.2. Names and knowledge (435d-439b) -- 8.2.1. Cratylus' view that names 'teach' (435d-436a) -- 8.2.2. Names might express false beliefs (436a-437d) -- 8.2.3. Names and the namegiver's knowledge (437d-438d) -- 8.2.4. Knowledge 'without names' (438d-430) -- 9.1. The arguments (439b-440d) -- 9.1.1. The lawgivers in a whirl (439bc) -- 9.1.2. Flux and forms: the arguments previewed -- 9.1.3. Enter the forms, exeunt particulars (439cd) -- 9.1.4. The first argument (439d) -- 9.1.5. The first argument and the Theaetetus -- 9.1.6. The second argument (439e) -- 9.1.7. The third argument (439e-440a) -- 9.1.8. The fourth argument (44oab) -- 9.1.9. Flux rejected? (44obc) -- 9.1.10. Conclusion (44ocd) -- 9.2. Epilogue (44ode).
Summary The first full-scale commentary on the Cratylus, one of Plato's most difficult and intriguing dialogues.
Other Title Print version: Ademollo, Francesco, 1973- Cratylus of Plato. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011 9780521763479